"I wished to work in the manner of Callot"

Exhibition-Capriccio
  • "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
    "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
  • "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
    "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
  • "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
    "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
  • "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
    "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
  • "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
    "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
  • "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
    "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
  • "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
    "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
  • "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"
    "I wished to work in the manner of Callot"

“No master has known so well as Callot how to assemble together in a small space such an abundance of motifs, emerging beside each other, even within each other, yet without confusing the eye, so that individual elements are seen as such, but still blend with the whole.”

E. T. A. Hoffmann, ‘Jacques Callot’ (1814)

Engravings by Jacques Callot (1592/93–1635) will become the basis for yet another IN ARTIBUS' exhibition. Seventy etchings, previously owned by Albertina museum in Vienna, and a drawing by the celebrated French master were provided to the Fund by Moscow collectors.

Exceptional accuracy of Callot's graphical talent, his utmost artistic integrity, and the credibility of visual representation as a result, has allowed his work to become not only a mirror of time through which we largely perceive his epoch — a turning point in European history, — but also a source, a breeding ground for many generations of artists, writers, and musicians. Despite the core of the exhibition being composed of works by a renowned master who occupies one of the most honorable niches in art history, the nature of the exhibition is not academic. Its subtitle Capriccio refers to the most unbound genre of art of Modern Age which has identical representation as in music, as in painting and drawing.

Jacques Callot is the head character of the exhibition, but is not the only to be displayed. In addition to the prints of the famous series of Balli di Sfessania (1621), Les Grandes Misères de la Guerre (1633), La Grande Passion (1618), and La Petite Passion (1624), the visual representation will be topped up by the work of other artists — both those whose plastic finds could have inspired the French artist, and those whose approach to art had been influenced by the ‘manner of Callot’. The exhibition will feature drawings by Joos de Momper, Rembrandt, G. B. Piranesi, J. L. David, Theodore Gericault, and Honore Daumier.

The second equal participant of the exhibition is the writer and composer E. T. A. Hoffmann, with a line from his essay ‘Jacques Callot’ (1814) making the name of the exhibition. Text pieces and music by Hoffmann are intended to serve not as an “illustration” to Callot's graphics, which would be explaining art that is clear without words, but rather as a kind of its acoustic and literary equivalents. Hoffmann will also appear surrounded by his literary fellows — from contemporaries to writers of XX century.

The selection of the cultural slice represented at the exhibition has been rather undirected. The unexpected juxtaposition of different authors, epochs, and forms of art can turn thoughts of the viewer a fruitful way as well as irritate him. The organizers do not seek to teach or edify, but they make a try to materialize, in game form, the inner leitmotif of art of the French master — to lead diverse origins to the harmonious coexistence. Anticipating criticisms for controversy of some interpretations, they can only repeat after Hoffmann: ‘I wished to work in the manner of Callot’.

in artibus foundation