Under One Sky

“UNDER ONE SKY”
Western European and Russian art 
from the collection of Inna Bazhenova

  • Under One Sky
    Georges Seurat. The hospital and the lighthouse of Honfleur. 1886
  • Under One Sky
    Aleksandr Drevin. Woman bathing. 1929-1930s
  • Under One Sky
    Henri Rousseau. Winter. 1907
  • Under One Sky
    Vladimir Weisberg. Three cubes and a coral. 1971
  • Under One Sky
    Maurice Utrillo. The Republic Street in Sannois. 1912
  • Under One Sky
    Nadezhda Udaltsova. Altai Mountains
  • Under One Sky
    Honoré Daumier. Billiard players
  • Under One Sky
    Pyotr Konchalovsky. Oak trees. 1921

In December 2016, the IN ARTIBUS foundation is opening an exhibition entitled “Under One Sky”: a display that will comprise sel ected works fr om the collection of its founder Inna Bazhenova. The collection has two equivalent directions: one is Western European art that covers a very broad time period, fr om 15th to 20th century, and the other is Russian painting of 20th century. The collection is quite unusual for this time as it is not limited by a particular framework, but rather is naturally following the variety of interferences in classical painting. The Russian part of the collection, though declared as a separate, still belongs to the all-European art history context.

Among some basic principles, that have formed Inna Bazhenova’s collection, the “Under One Sky” exhibition emphasizes only one of those — but a very important one: the interrelations between Russian and European art at the turn of 19th century and, in particular, the influence of the French school on the Russian school in 20th century. The display is not meant to be a literal illustration of the theme: it’s intended to give an idea of how the process of forming a collection could allow for comprehending plastic comparisons in art.

The viewers will be able to see about 60 works by Russian and European painters among which are Honoré Daumier and Georges Seurat, Henri Rousseau and Odilon Redon, Aleksandr Drevin and Konstantin Istomin, Anatoly Zverev and Vladimir Weisberg. Some of the works have been exhibited in Russia and abroad during the last decade, but some of them are displayed for the first time.

The small ‘Billiard Players’ by Honoré Daumier, one of the highlights of the collection, a work wh ere the artist is seeking the best method for depicting motion, is one of the earliest works at the exhibition. The display will as well include a plein air study ‘The Hospital and the Lighthouse of Honfleur’ by Georges Seurat, which have recently been displayed at an exhibition at Kröller-Müller Museum in the Netherlands, the largest exhibition of the artist for the last years. It is to mention that no works by this artist are presented in the Russian museums.

It is the first chance for the Moscow audience to see the works of a contemporary of the Impressionists, a French artist Adolphe Monticelli — the Foundation is also looking to open his solo exhibition in the near future. Three works by Maurice Utrillo will become a kind of a tuning-fork for the Moscow landscapes of the 1960s. A number of versions of Russian “cezannism” will be presented by the works of Pyotr Konchalovsky, Aleksandr Shevchenko and Nikolay Sinezubov. Portraits and landscapes by Aleksandr Drevin, Nadezhda Udaltsova and Antonina Sofronova that are not familiar to a general audience, the coloristic fairy show of early Anatoly Zverev, and flawless compositions by Vladimir Weisberg are going to flesh out viewer’s impression of the Russian art of the mid-20th century.

in artibus foundation